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ARCOR® N / ARCOR V Salt Bath Nitriding

ARCOR N is distinctive in that it is an austenitic, rather than a ferritic salt bath nitriding process. ARCOR N processing begins with immersion in an ionic liquid media, to produce a 10-25 micron surface layer of epsilon iron nitride above a nitrogen diffusion layer; an oxidizing bath to enhance corrosion performance; a rinsing step; and finally polymer impregnation, which seals the superficial voids in the iron oxy-nitride, further enhancing corrosion protection.

ARCOR N salt bath nitriding delivers both hardness and ductility during its short process cycle. Its ductile compound layer provides outstanding resistance to wear and corrosion. When used with its Corolac post-treatment bath, ARCOR N corrosion performance is up to 1000 hours, per ASTM B117.

Parts treated with ARCOR N salt bath nitriding effectively resist seizure. The micro-layer inhibits the formation of frictional welding points and assists the running-in of components. The hard, yet ductile surface layers make ARCOR treated parts compatible with mating surfaces without surface cracking or exfoliation. Finally, the ARCOR N process produces substantial improvements in fatigue resistance. ARCOR N has proved its ability to improve compound layer quality — particularly for cast irons — shorten cycle times, and reduce total costs.

ARCOR V was engineered specifically for automotive engine valves, but works well on all high chromium materials. This process provides two valuable benefits: a shorter process cycle, and highly uniform, repeatable results often difficult to achieve on high chromium steels. ARCOR V is also the best choice for nitrocarburizing of cast iron materials, due to the improved quality of the compound layer.

ARCOR C
From 530°C to 570°C

ARCOR V
From 500°C to 590°C

ARCOR N
630°C

     
  • Better lubricant retention
  • This salt bath nitriding product is well-suited for general purpose applications
  • Best for high-chromium steels and engine valve materials.
  • Better control of surface
    roughness
  • Best on cast-iron materials
  • Shorter treatment time = more economical
  • Nitrogen austenite layer (soft layer) below the compound layer
  • Cracking protection of the compound layer under flexion
  • More ductile layer